Iran says it will continue its ballistic missile program

Germany's domestic intelligence agency said in its annual report that Iran has a "clandestine" effort to seek illicit nuclear technology and equipment from German companies "at what is, even by global standards, a quantitatively high level".

In a 317-page report published last week, the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution, known by its German acronym BfV, said that Iran is engaging in "illegal proliferation-sensitive procurement activities in Germany ... at what is, even by global standards, a quantitatively high level".

Iran's top nuclear official has stressed the Islamic Republic's strong commitment to the nuclear agreement struck between Iran and six world countries in July 2015, warning the United States about the negative repercussions of violating the deal.

Commenting on the reports on July 8, Foreign Ministry spokesman Martin Schaefer said that they made for "unpleasant" reading, but he noted that they covered a period before the landmark nuclear deal went into force in January of this year.

The Institute for Science and International Security also issued a report Thursday asserting that Iran's Atomic Energy Organization had attempted to acquire carbon fiber, a key element in centrifuge construction.

With the ink barely dry on the deal between the USA and Iran to prevent the Islamic Republic from securing nuclear weapons, a new German intelligence document charges that Iran continues to flout the agreement.

"I feel they are cooking up a plot against us". 90 of those attempts were described as illegal activities to procure technology that could be used for the development of nuclear weapons and launchers. "We are watching this closely".

Schaefer said Germany had a "great deal of faith" in President Hassan Rouhani and Foreign Minister Javad Zarif and had the impression that Tehran was doing its best to stick to the deal, which ended a 12-year standoff with the West over the nuclear programme.

He also said that the report spoke "mainly" of Iran's missile program.

In this picture released by an official website of office of the Iranian supreme leader, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei attends a meeting with Iranian officials in Tehran, Iran, on June 14.

The resolution calls for Iran not to launch any ballistic missiles capable of delivering a nuclear weapon.

Akbar Salehi, the head of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) also criticized USA, warning the United States about the negative repercussions of violating the deal.

Ban's report stopped short of calling the missile launches a "violation" of Security Council Resolution 2231, which endorsed the nuclear agreement that defused Iranian-Western tensions which had raised fears of a wider Middle East war.

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