Dem candidate Ossoff sets new fundraising record in Georgia race

Candidates in Georgia's 6th Congressional District race Republican Karen Handel left and Democrat Jon Ossoff prepare to debate Tuesday

Five moments that mattered in the Georgia special election debate

The Huffington Post, using numbers from MIT's Living Wage Calculator, reported that the minimum livable wage for one adult in Georgia's 6th District is $12.01 per hour - almost $5 more than what a current federal minimum wage owner earns each hour. Many states and cities have higher minimums, though Georgia is not among them.

He said he supports increases "indexed to cost-of-living", meaning different communities could set different wages.

She called it the "fundamental difference between a liberal and conservative". I do not support a livable [sic] wage.

She said in a statement: "The private sector creates good paying jobs when we have a robust economy with lower taxes and less regulation".

Handel clarified the comment with WSB-TV, saying that she opposed the government getting involved in growing salaries. "He doesn't want the people of Georgia to know that he is a liberal Democrat".

Despite her follow-up, Handel's comments nearly instantly went viral, and groups like the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee were quick to clip and widely share the moment.

The Democratic Party's official Twitter account labeled her position "indefensible" and Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez said the comments prove "she has no business being in Congress".

That two-track approach - going directly to typically Democratic voters and vocal opponents of President Donald Trump, while using television to convince just enough independents and even moderate Republicans - is a necessary balancing act for Ossoff to pull off an upset over Republican Karen Handel in a district Republicans have held since 1979.

The dispute was carried over from an earlier debate this week, with Handel asserting the fact that Planned Parenthood doesn't directly provide mammograms, while Ossoff pointed to the hundreds of thousands of breast cancer screenings-a separate diagnostic service-the organization does offer.

But Handel downplayed her role.

Handel, a businesswoman who once served as Georgia's secretary of state, said Ossoff's support comes from places utterly unlike Georgia.

According to Handel, she didn't mean that she opposes her constituents earning a livable wage. And we're not even talking about the millions that outside groups have spent on the contest so far - some of which has helped Handel even the score. I was born and raised in Georgia, unlike Secretary Handel who was born and raised in Washington, D.C.

Handel and Ossoff are embroiled in an expensive special election that has become a proxy for national political dynamics. He received 48.1% of the vote, shy of the 50% needed to win outright.

Cobb political observers were split over picking a victor of Tuesday's televised debate between Republican Karen Handel and Democrat Jon Ossoff, with each preferring the candidate from their own party.

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