Mobile Caps High-Speed Data At 5GB While Roaming In Canada, Mexico

According to T-Mobile, less than one-percent of its customers with Mobile without Borders actually travel to Mexico or Canada and use over 5GB of data while visiting.

T-Mobile has announced its latest Uncarrier initiative which is called "Mobile without Borders", the company is doing away with extra call charges across North America.

With T-Mobile ONE and ONE Plus the limit is 50 gigabytes. Once the cap is reached, you will be switched to Simple Global speeds only. T-Mobile notes you can still pay for the One Plus International add-on and get unlimited LTE in Mexico and Canada.

If you have 10GB high speed data total and use 2 GB the U.S. before heading over the border, then you still only have up to 5GB high-speed data in Mexico and Canada combined. Once that 5GB limit is hit, speeds will be throttled down to 128kbps (or 256kbps if you have T-Mobile ONE Plus). T-Mobile ONE Plus plan holders will see their data speeds slowed to 256Kbps, while T-Mobile ONE subs will have their speeds slowed all the way down to just 128Kbps.

This change is to "prevent usage beyond the intent of the product". However, this is a monthly fee, better than Verizon's plan that offers $10 per day.

We already know that T-Mobile's unlimited plans have limits, just like they do at every other wireless carrier.

The company went on to say that "less than 1 percent of people with this benefit travel to Mexico and Canada use over 5GB a month".

On November 12, T-Mobile will be adjusting the initial Mobile without Borders offer so that customers will only have access to 5GB of LTE data when traveling overseas in Mexico or Canada. You'll be even able to tap into your Data Stash in Mexico & Canada starting later this year.

T-Mobile subscribers got some fantastic news earlier this week. For example, T-Mobile limits the amount of guaranteed full-speed LTE data its subscribers can use during a billing period to 50GB.

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