Now you can order food on Facebook

Facebook now lets you order food without leaving Facebook

Facebook will now let you order food

You find a restaurant on JustEat, Deliveroo or any number of similar sites and apps, select your food and wait. They are combining various delivery services such as ChowNow, EatStreet, Delivery.com, Olo and DoorDash. Restaurants' Facebook pages have an "order now" button, and they will also be able to browse through different restaurants in the "order food" tab. This isn't ideal for Facebook, as the company wants you constant attention. That's where all the ordering actually happens, so you're not actually doing much with the Facebook app beyond finding a restaurant and tapping your preferred delivery option.

The release cites Five Guys, Panera, Chipotle and Papa John's as a few of the chains that are participating in their program. It's a pretty easy, low effort way to have food delivered right to your doorstep.

Orders can be placed for either takeout or delivery, and if you already have a Delivery.com account, you can use your existing login.

"You can browse restaurants nearby by visiting the Order Food section in the Explore menu", Himel explains. So now you can apply for a job and then eat your feelings if you get rejected, all without ever leaving the cosy blue cocoon of the news feed. Here's how the feature, which just rolled out to Facebook users in the U.S., will work.

"We've been testing this since a year ago, and after responding to feedback and adding more partners, we're rolling out everywhere in the United States on iOS, Android and desktop", Himel concludes.

Facebook today formally announced its new feature that allows users to order food from local restaurants using its app. Bit by bit, Facebook is working on cornering another tiny slice of our attention, and giving people reasons to stick around and scroll for a little longer.

Facebook has been developing a deeper relationship with food ordering businesses for some time.

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