Zuckerberg's insensitive VR joyride around Puerto Rico is disgusting to watch

Image Screengrab via Facebook

Image Screengrab via Facebook

The company is taking help of artificial intelligence and satellite imagery to determine areas to provide aid.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg showcased his company's virtual reality (VR) system Monday by conducting a live-stream tour of Puerto Rico, a USA territory recently ravaged by Hurricane Maria. Zuckerberg stated that "population maps" have been drawn up with the help of artificial intelligence, showing the satellite imagery and the places where the individuals are living who need help. The presentation was actually hosted from Facebook's headquarters in Menlo Park, California, with the two wearing VR headsets. In the virtual reality livestream, they were animated figures. Moreover, it will help people determine their location and density in those places.

This time, the Zuck appeared in a livestream promoting a Facebook VR tool as a cartoon version of himself in disaster-stricken Puerto Rico. "Rachel and I aren't even in the same building in the physical world, but it feels like we're in the same place and can make eye contact", Zuckerberg said before sharing an awkward high-fiving with Franklin in virtual reality in front of flooded homes in the USA territory.

"One of the things that's really magical about VR is you can get the feeling you're really in a place", said Zuckerberg as his avatar floated above the scenes of abject devastation below.

"When you are in the middle of a disaster like this, it's really important that people have access to the internet", he said, noting it's useful in communicating with loved ones. Not just the grinning Zuckerberg cartoon, but also a high-five moment between Franklin and Zuckerberg with boring scenes around was awkward.

"Yeah, it's really insane to feel like you're in the middle of it... right, do you wanna teleport somewhere else?"

The use of the Spaces platform comes ahead of Oculus Connect, Facebook's annual Oculus developer conference. Some other spots they "teleported" to included the surface of the moon and next to Zuckerberg's dog, Beast. Further, stressing the importance of the Internet, he said that relief workers should be able to coordinate to find out the spot where people are looking for help.

Southwest Airlines kicks off its 72-hour sale
Offshore wind farms have powerful advantage over land-based turbines, study finds