Iran bans English lessons in primary schools

Iran bans English lessons in primary schools

Iran bans English lessons in primary schools

Iran's culture ministry has warned of the "cultural threat" posed by Western powers, leading authorities to ban English language lessons in all primary schools.

He says the language of science is not necessarily English and that children should be taught other languages like Spanish, French, or eastern languages.

"These remarks do not mean terminating English language teaching at schools, but the main issue is to know our rival and how precisely the opposite party has made planning to influence the country's future generation", he said.

While the teaching of English in Iran generally begins in Middle School, where students are aged between 12 and 14, some primary schools have English classes too.

The Iranian government is cracking down after a week of anti-government protests by pushing for a ban on teaching English in primary schools. And many children from more privileged families attending nongovernment schools receive English tuition from day care through high school.

It is not the first time that Iran raises the alarm about the risk of a "cultural invasion".

Many middle class families already take their kids to independent language institutions after school hours because the methods used to teach English at normal schools aren't very successful.

"That does not mean opposition to learning a foreign language, but (this is the) promotion of a foreign culture in the country and among children, young adults and youths", he added. In 2017, Iran's intelligence agency banned the publication of a Kurdish-language instruction book.

On January 5, four special rapporteurs from the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights urged the Iranian government to respect the rights of protesters and end its blocking of the internet.

While there was no mention of the announcement being linked to more than a week of protests against the clerical establishment and government, Iran's Revolutionary Guards have said that the unrest was also fomented by foreign enemies. A number of Iranians have jokingly called it "The filtering of English". George Grow was the editor.

Ayatollah Khamenei laid out his views on the issue in a 2016 speech given to teachers, criticising the spread of English to nursery schools. Write to us in the Comments Section or on our Facebook page.

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