Judge Dismisses 'Player Hater' Copyright Suit Against Taylor Swift

Taylor Swift lyrics ruled too “banal”

Taylor Swift performs at the Z100's iHeartRadio Jingle Ball 2017 at Madison Square Garden

'The concept of actors acting in accordance with their essential nature is not at all creative - it is banal. In the lawsuit Hall and Butler claimed that Swift's lyric "Cause the players gonna play, play, play, play, play/And the haters gonna hate, hate, hate, hate, hate", was a rip off of their line "The playas gon play/Them haters gonna hate".

"In order for such short phrases to be protected under the Copyright Act, they must be more creative than the lyrics at issue here", Fitzgerald ruled, according to court papers.

Swift's lawyers submitted a motion to dismiss the claim in early January and the court granted the motion on Monday, February 12.

For comparison purposes, Swift, in "Shake It Off" declares "The players gonna play, play, play, play, play and the haters gonna hate, hate, hate, hate, hate".

Fitzgerald, in rather withering remarks as reported by The Guardian and other outlets, did not think that either artist's lyrics were particularly brilliant or original.

Hall has written and produced for Justin Bieber and Maroon 5, while Butler has worked with artistsincluding Backstreet Boys and Luther Vandross.

Gerard Fox, one of the songwriters who brought the case against Swift, has not taken the ruling well.

"He can not make himself an expert in the music industry", Fox said.

A spokesperson for Taylor previously called Hall and Butler's suit a 'ridiculous claim and nothing more than a money grab. The law is simple and clear. "They do not have a case", they wrote.

We are thankful the lawsuit has been dismissed and Swift can now move on to bigger and better things, like her reputation stadium tour, kicking off in May.

Taylor Swift performs at the 2016 Grammy awards.

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