Trump Confidant Joe diGenova Urges President To Fire Rosenstein

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Trump was disputing a New York Times report published Tuesday that said the President sought to fire Mueller in December following reports that Mueller was seeking Trump's financial records.

United States president Donald Trump, who has repeatedly condemned as a "witch hunt" a federal inquiry into possible collusion between Moscow and his presidential campaign, said on Thursday he backed a "co-operative" approach to the Russian Federation investigation. In some cases, they have explained to Mr. Trump how anything that causes him to lose support from congressional Republicans could further imperil his presidency. The two GOP senators said they didn't think Trump would really move to fire Mueller. When it was revealed in October that the Clinton campaign paid for the Steele dossier, Mueller should have pivoted off Trump and focused on Hillary Clinton.

Trump bashed the raid as an "attack on our country" and opened the possibility of firing Mueller, something that Cobb and others have cautioned him against. Cory Booker, D-N.J., would ensure that any action to remove a special counsel would have to be reviewed by a panel of federal judges.

As the investigation has worn on, Trump has called it a "witch hunt". How much worse, then, that President Donald Trump is no Lincoln or Jefferson but a narcissistic, impulsive man who knows little history, refuses to take advice from those who do, gets his policy briefings from Fox News talking heads and uses Twitter as his preferred method of issuing policy directives and executing foreign policy.

And if this president is successfully removed, will there ever again be a presidential election that isn't immediately followed by an open-ended "find something, anything" probe like Mueller's?

(Attorney General Jeff Sessions recused himself from the investigation related to the 2016 campaign.) If Trump were to sack Rosenstein, the deputy's successor would take control over the special counsel and scope of his investigation.

Sen. Chuck Grassley, Republican-Iowa, the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, said on Tuesday on Fox Business News: "It would be suicide for the president to want to talk about firing Mueller".

U.S. President Donald Trump is pushing back against a New York Times report that said he had late a year ago considered firing special counsel Robert Mueller, who is heading the criminal investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

Trump's ire toward Mueller appeared to intensify this week as Federal Bureau of Investigation agents raided the office and hotel room of Michael Cohen, the President's personal lawyer.

Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan, who announced Wednesday that he will not run for re-election in November, said he has received "assurances" from the White House that Trump will not move against Mueller or Rosenstein.

Asked if he was anxious, Mr. Cohen said: "I would be lying to you if I told that I am not".

Trump's longtime friend Roger Stone is also calling on the president to fire Rosenstein, he told ABC News Wednesday, as former White House chief political strategist Steve Bannon also did in an interview with The Washington Post Wednesday.

But the key question is whether that new person, once appointed, could fire Mueller.

"Trump could keep firing people down the chain of command until he found someone willing to fire Mueller", Kent said. But the Trump remarks were a dramatic departure from customary White House diplomatic language, even when addressed to tyrants.

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