Facebook users hit by fresh data scandal

Answering questions Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will appear before members of the European Parliament to answer questions about the improper use of users data

Facebook users hit by fresh data scandal

Facebook has suspended 200 apps for possible misuse of user data in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal. The dataset was collected via the personality quiz app "myPersonality" by academics at the University of Cambridge. He said Facebook would notify users about such bans and make it possible for them to check whether their data was misused.

Grabbing the login details from GitHub granted access to the sensitive data "in less than a minute" and has, in fact, been publicly visible on the website for the past four years.

Experts are anxious that the researchers didn't do enough to anonymize the data, as well. Aleksandr Kogan, who created tools for Cambridge Analytica that allowed the political consultancy to psychologically profile and target voters, bought the data from the microblogging website in 2015, before the recent scandal came to light, The Sunday Telegraph reported.

Aside from the data set, the application was also able to collect information from around 22 million status updates from more than 150,000 users.

Facebook says it's now investigating the app, and if myPersonality refuses to cooperate or fails the audit, the company will ban it. "It is disappointing that a company with the resources of Facebook chooses not to provide a sufficient level of detail and transparency on various points including on Cambridge Analytica, dark ads, Facebook Connect, the amount spent by Russian Federation on United Kingdom ads on the platform, data collection across the web, budgets for investigations, and that shows general discrepancies between Schroepfer and Zuckerberg's respective testimonies", Collins said in a statement. About 270,000 people downloaded Kogan's personality-quiz app, which shared information on the people and their friends that then was improperly passed to Cambridge Analytica.

The report further claimed that Cambridge Analytica actually tried to get this data too from the researchers David Stillwell and Michal Kosinski of the University of Cambridge's The Psychometrics Centre.

Included within this is a confidentiality agreement, or gagging order, which prevented Kogan from discussing his settlement with Facebook when he appeared in front of the Digital, Culture, Media, and Sport Committee last month. The University of Cambridge does not own or control the app or data.

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