NCAA passes reform that allows athletes to transfer without permission

NCAA passes reform that allows athletes to transfer without permission

NCAA passes reform that allows athletes to transfer without permission

The Division I Board of Directors developed a series of principles to guide the Transfer Working group, which included that any rule changes should "support the academic success of student-athletes", and "be based on data and create the least restrictive environment possible for student-athletes".

Much of the talk about transfers focuses on the so-called year-in-residence, the one year a player in the most high-profile sports such as football and basketball must sit out after switching schools.

The rule will be put into effect immediately. Instead of a student-athlete asking for permission to transfer from his or her school, the student-athlete will now simply inform the school of his or her decision to transfer.

As we've seen in recent weeks with the SEC voting to allow inter-conference graduate transfers, the Power Five conferences can implement their own nuances to a national rule.

Previously, that rule allowed players to obtain a medical redshirt if they played in four games or less than 30 percent of their games that season.

However, this could also be a way for coaches to get talented young players on the field while still preserving that fifth year of eligibility, allowing redshirt players to get game experience against "cupcake" teams or potentially play a factor in bowl games. Once the individual's name is in the database, coaches at other institutions have free reign to contact the student.

"This change promotes not only fairness for college athletes, but also their health and well-being".

The NCAA has made several attempts in recent years to change transfer rules, but this is the first to come up with something substantive - if not comprehensive. Four games, to be exact. "Coaches will appreciate the additional flexibility and ability to give younger players an opportunity to participate in limited competition". Previously, college coaches were able to block the transferring athlete from certain schools, and the athlete was required to obtain permission for schools to contact him.

The previous transfer rule, which required student-athletes to get permission from their current school to contact another school before they can receive a scholarship after transfer, was meant to discourage coaches from recruiting student-athletes from other Division I schools.

Additionally, the proposal adds tampering with a current student-athlete at another school to the list of potential Level 2 violations, considered a significant breach of conduct.

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