Net Neutrality ends Monday

The Federal Communications Commission rollback of net neutrality went into effect today. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai championed the move while commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel opposed

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The Federal Communications Commission's rules preventing Internet service providers from blocking or slowing legal traffic, or charging for faster delivery of some content, passed with much fanfare in 2015, are history as of Monday.

There are a few states that are battling the repeal of net neutrality within their own governments, both NY and Washington have already passed legislation that stops or discourages internet providers from favoring content. California is now in the process of passing a similar law, which will give users stricter protections that those under the Obama Era net neutrality rules.

A coalition of pro net-neutrality organizations has named Monday, June 11, as "Neutrality Action Day", and they're encouraging members to spread their messages on social media and contact their local representatives in the House. "In 2015, the FCC stripped the FTC-the nation's premier consumer protection agency- of its authority over internet service providers". Companies that pay more are essentially given higher priority. Pai's administration announced its initial review of net neutrality practices over the summer, prompting tech companies like reddit and Netflix to simulate a slower Internet.

To put it simply, internet service providers could start charging companies to ensure their content loads at a decent speed, which is very important if a company is to be successful online. Some states are moving to restore net neutrality, and lawsuits are pending.

Washington and OR have gone farther, and passed laws that require all ISPs within their borders to offer net neutrality protections.

The law was repealed in December by the Federal Communications Commission, but it only came into effect today.

Greer predicts that ISPs will first create packages that seem favorable to consumers, such as providing one of their own services for free while tacking on a fee for a rival service. Or they could block websites or apps that offer competing services to their own.

It was put in place by the Obama Administration but President Trump made a decision to scrap the rule in December.

Broadband companies have said that they will still continue to uphold the Net Neutrality principles but some Net Neutrality supporters say that it's not enough to just trust all the companies.

E-commerce start-ups have feared that they could end up on the losing end of paid prioritization, with their websites and services loading more slowly than those run by internet behemoths. Per the net neutrality order, states can not enact any legislation that attempts to circumvent the repeal. As a result, the internet could become more like the TV networks, where you pay for different packages of internet services. So far, Oregon, Vermont and Washington have passed net neutrality legislation and California's Senate passed a net neutrality bill last month.

Another misleading ISP claim is that they want to get rid of Title II, and not net neutrality rules in general.

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