Brian Cashman signs letter endorsing Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh

Trump's Hollywood critics line up against Kavanaugh

Greg Nash

Tennessee's senators were complimentary of President Trump's pick for the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday night, but they withheld explicit support.

The director of "Avengers: Age of Ultron" told fans late Monday that President Trump will usher in an era worse than anything conceived by a Marvel supervillain.

In one of them, Kavanaugh ruled against a group of Verizon employees represented by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers.

Kavanaugh still lives in the D.C. area, raising his kids in the Maryland suburbs just miles from the White House.

Democrats have already seized on the documents to make new demands, hoping to disclose controversies that could add new complications to Kavanaugh's prospects in the narrowly divided Senate.

Prior to being tapped by Trump, some conservatives questioned Kavanaugh's bona fides, and he's controversial with Democrats because of his role in the Starr investigation of Clinton.

Casey says the list of judges Trump has used to find a Supreme Court nominee is the "fruit of a corrupt process straight from the D.C. swamp".

His mother was also a judge.

Kavanaugh graduated from Yale Law School and clerked for Kennedy in the mid-1990s.

Critics allege that Kavanaugh will do his darnedest to upend the 1973 ruling Roe v. Wade, which legalized abortion. It's unclear what evidence there is for that, other than Trump's promise to appoint anti-abortion judges. "A judge must interpret statutes as written and a judge must interpret the Constitution as written, informed by history and tradition and precedent".

Trump nominated Kavanaugh after interviewing several candidates and eventually focusing his consideration on four: Kavanaugh, Michigan federal judge Raymond Kethledge, and federal judges Amy Coney Barrett and Thomas Hardiman.

In the background, a constellation of liberal activist groups promised Tuesday to mobilize their members and pressure both Republicans and Democrats to oppose Kavanaugh. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of ME, moderate Republicans both - were coy when asked on Tuesday for their thoughts on Kavanaugh. He is being accompanied by Vice President Mike Pence and former Sen.

Kavanaugh has also touched on the subject of Roe itself on a couple of occasions, but without presenting clear-cut proof of his legal position.

Meanwhile, Republicans are hoping Kavanaugh can earn bipartisan support and are seeking to woo Democrats up for re-election in states that Trump won easily in 2016, such as Joe Donnelly of in and Joe Manchin of West Virginia. "If we can make that case, we will get a majority".

"He is a brilliant jurist, with a clear and effective writing style, universally regarded as one of the finest and sharpest legal minds of our time", Trump said in his prime-time televised White House announcement. McConnell had said the victor of the presidential election should make the choice. Trump also has suggested he could pardon himself.

Noah Feldman, a Harvard law professor, wrote in a Bloomberg column that while Democrats argue that Kavanaugh believes a president shouldn't be indicted while in office, "Kavanaugh's expressed views actually support the opposite conclusion: that the president can be investigated and maybe even indicted unless Congress passes a law saying he can't - which Congress has not done".

Kavanaugh wrote that civil suits and criminal investigations take away from a president's focus on his or her work responsibilities. He thought that impeachment was an adequate check, "if a president does something dastardly".

In that case, Agri Processor claimed that undocumented workers were not covered by the National Labor Relations Act of 1935 because a more recent law ― the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 ― said it was illegal to knowingly employ them.

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