Senate Judiciary announces Kavanaugh's confirmation hearing

President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh

President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh

New documents have been released from Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's time on the Kenneth Starr team investigating Bill Clinton that reveal his resistance to issuing an indictment of a sitting president.

The memo, tucked toward the end of almost 10,000 pages released Friday, provides greater insight into Kavanaugh's views on executive power that are expected to feature prominently in his Senate confirmation hearings. Democrats have warned that Kavanaugh may be unwilling to protect special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into possible coordination between President Donald Trump's 2016 campaign and Russian Federation.

The Senate will begin the confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on September 4.

But Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer, who has promised to fight Kavanaugh's nomination, said in a statement that Republicans were in a "mad rush" to hold hearings after deciding to block almost all of Kavanaugh's records from public release. Kavanaugh will go under questioning September 5.

Leading Democrats in the Senate immediately questioned Republicans' motives for the timing of the confirmation hearing.

August 2: Sen. Grassley and Senate Republicans said they are still planning to move forward with Kavanaugh's hearings, even without the vast majority of Kavanaugh's documents. The Judiciary Committee said they only plan to release 125,000 documents total.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said earlier on Friday that he hopes Kavanaugh would be confirmed by the Senate "before the first Monday in October".

August 2: Former President George W. Bush revealed he is working with William A. Burck - a right-wing political operative who served as a deputy to Kavanaugh in 2005 and is now the attorney representing Steve Bannon, Reince Priebus, and Donald McGahn in the Russian Federation probe - to vet which documents from Kavanaugh's record are released to the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Grassley has previously said Kavanaugh's vetting process is probably the "deepest dive" ever conducted on a Supreme Court nominee. Meanwhile, most of the White House records related to Kavanaugh are being held on a "committee confidential" basis, with just 5,700 pages from his White House years released this week to the public.

"At this current pace, we have plenty of time to review the rest of emails and other records that we will receive from President Bush and the National Archives", he said.

White House spokesperson Raj Shah said that "Chairman Grassley has lived up to his promise to lead an open, transparent and fair process". Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, last month.

Breitbart News' Ken Klukowski has pointed out that Kavanaugh's opinions have been in the public domain for years and Kavanaugh "returned the most comprehensive, bipartisan Senate questionnaire in the history of the Judiciary Committee".

On his time at the White House, Kavanaugh has said, "my five and a half years in the White House - and especially my three years as Staff Secretary for President Bush - were among the most interesting and in many ways among the most instructive".

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