Three die in plane crash in Greenville

The FAA is investigating a crash involving a plane from Pembroke that was bound for Prince Edward Island on Monday

Three die in plane crash in Greenville

A spokeswoman for the Pembroke airport said the flight was one of two that departed around 9 a.m. on Monday morning, but had no information about the nationality of the three on board or the nature of the flight.

Three people died Monday, July 30 when their small plane crashed in Greenville on its way to Prince Edward Island, police said.

Jesse Crandall says witnesses saw the airplane pass over Greenville Municipal Airport, bank sharply and then descend suddenly to the ground on the approach to the runway.

Crandall arrived at the airport just minutes after the crash, where first responders told him there were no survivors in the mangled twin-engine propeller Piper Smith-Aerostar 600 light aircraft.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Jim Peters early Monday afternoon said the FAA will investigate the crash and the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the probable cause of the accident.

The names of the victims and where they are from were not immediately available, said Greenville Police Chief Jeff Pomerleau in a 3 p.m. news conference near the scene.

State police said they were assisting local police at the crash site, which was in a grassy field area outside the airport.

The plane left from Pembroke Airport, which is about 145 kilometres northwest of Ottawa, near the provincial boundary of Ontario and Quebec.

The FAA announced this morning that the small Aerostar plane was privately owned and registered to a Canadian pilot.

The Guardian was unsuccessful in reaching Charlottetown Airport Authority CEO Doug Newson to confirm that the Island's capital city was the plane's destination. The crash occurred at 11 AM EST in Greenville, a small rural town in Maine, USA.

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