Weird Rectangular Iceberg in Antarctica Isn’t Alone, NASA Photos Show

A Landsat 8 satellite image shows part of the northern Antarctic Peninsula with an arrow pointing to the rectangular

A Landsat 8 satellite image shows part of the northern Antarctic Peninsula with an arrow pointing to the rectangular

On October 16, NASA scientists found a number of large icebergs between Antarctica's Larsen C ice shelf and the A-68 ice island, which separated from the ice shelf past year.

Harbeck was the one who spotted this flat-topped, sharp-angled, iceberg floating off Larsen C ice shelf, notes the report. Photo photographed from onboard the IceBridge mission, which specializiruetsya on monitoring changes in polar ice. Previously, NASA has launched a project to search for extraterrestrial civilizations. More: https://t.co/kADuUL455F pic.twitter.com/tm4Rydh8V3 - NASA ICE (@NASA_ICE) October 23, 2018 'I thought it was pretty interesting, ' Jeremy Harbeck, senior scientist with the IceBridge mission that was flying over Antarctica at the time, explains.

The rectangular iceberg itself seems to be freshly calved from Larsen C. This is the same ice sheet from which broke a massive, trillion-ton A 68 iceberg.

In a different photo (above), Harbeck captured both the edge of the now-famous iceberg, and a slightly less rectangular iceberg.

The photo of the rectangular iceberg was widely shared after it was posted on social media.

The second table also split the iceberg from the ice shelf, Larsen S.

The A-68 ice island is roughly the size of Delaware.

Scientists with NASA's Operation IceBridge released the original photo last week, but it only showed a portion of the odd iceberg.

This show-stopping tabular iceberg is an estimated 1.6 kilometers (1 mile) across with clean edges that indicate it had probably broken off fairly recently, reported Science Alert.

Non-tabular icebergs are the ones we tend to think about in the more traditional sense, but our steep-sided and flat-topped friends have something in common with their more recognizable cousins: they likely take on a more geometric shape below the surface, making them just as hazardous for passing ships.

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