Senators introduce bipartisan resolution to blame Saudi Arabia for Jamal Khashoggi's death

Hollywood star calls for action on Khashoggi's murder

Khashoggi murder: CIA chief Haspel 'to brief Congress'

Lawmakers on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee used a nomination hearing on Tuesday that included Christopher Henzel, a career diplomat tapped to be next ambassador to Yemen, to vent their frustrations about the Trump administration over its relationship with Saudi Arabia. Sen.

Khalid's return to the US comes just one day after a closed US Senate briefing by Central Intelligence Agency chief Gina Haspel.

But the debate could become a virtual trial over Prince Mohammed's responsibility for Khashoggi's murder at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul and Trump's effort to downplay it. Senators could add amendments to further punish the kingdom.

Graham (R-S.C.) said that the October killing of Khashoggi could not have taken place without MBS knowing about it. Dianne Feinstein, the resolution says the Senate "has a high level of confidence" that the crown prince "was complicit in the murder".

The prosecutor is seeking warrants for royal court adviser Saud al-Qahtani and deputy intelligence chief Ahmed al-Assiri, who are believed to have overseen the team that killed and dismembered Khashoggi at the kingdom's Istanbul consulate in October.

The strongly-worded resolution also holds MBS accountable for alleged atrocities committed during the war in Yemen, which Saudi Arabia entered in 2015 through a massive bombing campaign.

Two weeks ago Trump said, "I don't know".

However, a USA official told NBC that Khalid is not expected to be expelled from the country and would continue on as ambassador.

The prime minister explained at the time that he had a "frank" conversation with the prince on the killing, Saudi Arabia's involvement in Yemen and jailed activists.

Bob Corker of Tennessee and Lindsey Graham of SC are leading the charge to offer new legislation that would rebuke Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, as well as potentially limit U.S. involvement in the Saudi-led war in Yemen, saying their push was bolstered by the classified briefing, which detailed intelligence linking the Saudi leader to the murder of the US-based journalist.

"It's time for the United States to be out of that war", said Sen.

Tuesday's briefing came a week after Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Secretary of Defence James Mattis had told senators that there was no hard evidence MBS was behind the killing and urged senators not to downgrade ties with Saudi Arabia over the incident.

After saying he had left the consulate alive, Saudi Arabia admitted weeks later that Khashoggi was killed there, blaming his death on a group of rogue Saudi operatives.

The administration has sanctioned 17 Saudis expected to involved, but lawmakers are demanding much more serious consequences.

The crown prince ordered and monitored the killing, Senator Bob Corker said.

"There are lots of Republicans who are going to try to water this down, but they'll have to find 50 votes, and I'm not sure that they have 50 votes for a substitute". The next vote, a motion to proceed with the final vote, could come as soon as Thursday, Senate aides told Foreign Policy.

Graham is one of the sponsors of the non-binding resolution.

The United States now provides arms shipments and logistical support including intelligence and targeting assistance to the Saudi-led coalition, which includes the United Arab Emirates and other Arab countries.

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