Man dies in Yosemite during government shutdown

Volunteers have done their best to keep some semblance of normality at the park

Image Volunteers have done their best to keep some semblance of normality at the park

Munoz went on to say that they did not issue a press release because of the shutdown and that the investigation is taking longer than usual.

As of January 3, 2019 the partial shutdown has been going on for almost 13 days, now making it the fourth longest in United States history.

Even the National Park Service website is not updated to reflect current conditions.

As the government shutdown approaches the end of its second week, national parks have remained open, albeit with no staff, raising the risk of injury and lowering the chances of rescue for those who get hurt.

Aerial view of Yosemite National Park in California.

After receiving a 911 call, "rangers were on scene in less than an hour and the visitor was removed from the water", Muñoz wrote in an email. But because there was no one to collect admission fees, the number of visitors has surged, and the skeleton crews can't handle the park traffic.

Reports have emerged during the shutdown of visitors to national parks during the shutdown violating park rules, with Yosemite visitors dumping garbage at vista points, defecating on the ground and bringing dogs into pet-restricted areas. So is human waste.

Joshua Tree National Park in the Mojave and Colorado deserts of Southern California has been forced to close all campgrounds starting Wednesday, The San Bernardino Sun reported. "Trash receptacles are overflowing, resulting in litter dispersal throughout the area and a threat to wildlife".

The ranger station is closed and only tire marks are in the snow, the roads and parking lots are not plowed.

"For most parks, there will be no National Park Service-provided visitor services, such as restrooms, trash collection, facilities or road maintenance", Jeremy Barnum, an NPS spokesman, told the outlet. With the park service unable to maintain these trails, private companies are splitting the cost of keeping them clear, as well as replacing toilet paper and emptying trash, so they can continue to run tours. "But it's something we can handle".

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