Electrofishing stuns hundreds of carp in mind-boggling video

Watch ‘electrofishing’ boat stun hundreds of invasive carp in Kentucky					
								
			
	
		Mike Wehner			@MikeWehner					August 1st 2019 at 11:07 PM					 Share Tweet

Watch ‘electrofishing’ boat stun hundreds of invasive carp in Kentucky Mike Wehner @MikeWehner August 1st 2019 at 11:07 PM Share Tweet

The fish don't die as soon as the current hits, but it's more like the shock makes it hard for them to move. In Kentucky, wildlife officials are doing their best to fight back against an invasion of Asian carp, and they're using electricity to do so.

The fish are invasive because they breed at an extremely high rate- a mature female Asian carp produces 1 million eggs per year- and the overpopulation of these fish mean there is less food to go around for other fish in the sea.

Fish and Wildlife officers in Kentucky used electro-fishing equipment to get a population count of the fish at Barkley Dam.

What do you do if there is a species of fish that are invading your waters and don't really have many natural predators?

An experimental Bio-Accoustic Fish Fence has been constructed to test its effectiveness for helping keep Asian Carp out of the waterways. The department used special boats with electrodes that pump electricity through the surface of the water.

Video of the incident shows the carp simultaneously jumping out of the water, while wildlife staff scoop the fish into their boat.

The electric current passed in the water immediately affects the fish in the nearby area.

Because there aren't many natural predators in the water where these fish swim, they've had to remove many of them at a time.

Asian Carp are an invasive species and experts are looking at ways to keep them from spreading. The Asian carp species is a major problem in the U.S. in Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio and IL river systems.

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