Many missing after deadly ambush near Canadian-run mine in Burkina Faso

People wounded in an ambush on a Canadian-owned mine were taken to hospital for treatment

People wounded in an ambush on a Canadian-owned mine were taken to hospital for treatment Credit REUTERS Bado Vincent

In August 2018, a Semafo employee and a subcontractor were killed when a bus carrying workers was attacked, and five police officers and an employee were killed in another attack a few days earlier.

Two separate attacks on convoys carrying Boungou mine employees in August and December previous year killed 11 people.

Col. Saidou Sanou, the region's governor, gave the provisional toll in a statement, while the mining company only said that it was aware of "several fatalities and injuries".

Another 60 people were wounded, local authorities said.

Authorities in Burkina Faso must "do everything in their power" to bring to justice the perpetrators of an attack on a mining company convoy in the West African nation on Wednesday, which killed dozens and left scores more injured, the UN chief said on Thursday.

Montreal-based gold miner Semafo Inc. says it has suspended operations at its Boungou mine in Burkina Faso a day after at least 37 people were killed in an ambush on their way to the site.

During a Security Council meeting on peace in Africa last month, Mr. Guterres declared that the sprawl of terrorist networks is a growing, transnational threat to the continent, with a pervasive climate crisis exacerbating violence, and straining resources.

The company blamed "armed bandits" for last year's attacks, and subsequently reinforced its armed escorts.

Nearly 500,000 people have also been forced to flee their homes.

The country's president lamented the attack in a televised address.

The attacks have been claimed by a range of jihadist groups, including al-Qaeda and the Islamic State.

The violence underscores the rapidly deteriorating security situation in Burkina Faso, which has been infiltrated by jihadists who have been active for years in neighboring Mali.

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