Epstein 'abuse' revealed in Virgin Islands lawsuit

A view of Jeffrey Epstein's stone mansion on Little St. James Island a property owned by Jeffrey Epstein Wednesday

Jeffrey Epstein used database to keep track of his 'numerous' victims

The late disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein sexually abused and trafficked girls as young as 12 on his private Caribbean island until as recently as past year, a new lawsuit alleged Wednesday.

The lawsuit against the estate expands the scope of the allegations of Epstein's misconduct and accuses him of abusing girls much younger than originally thought.

Attorney General Denise George claimed that Epstein's criminal enterprise "facilitated. the sexual molestation and exploitation of numerous girls" on Little St. James and Great St. James, located in the USA territory.

In the lawsuit obtained by The New York Times, the documentation states "Epstein clearly used the Virgin Islands and his residence in the U.S. Virgin Islands at Little Saint James as a way to be able to hide and to be able to expand his activity here".

In July, prosecutors charged Epstein with one count of sex trafficking of minors and another of conspiracy to commit sex trafficking of minors in NY and Florida.

In August, two unnamed women who claim Epstein sexually abused them filed a $100 million lawsuit against his estate and his "female recruiter". George enlisted her office's independent investigators and court documents from other cases to allege that Little Saint James was the epicenter of a decades-long sex trafficking scheme.

The lawsuit is the first filed against Epstein's estate by a government and could do a lot to restore the region's tainted reputation as an adult playground with no consequences for the rich and powerful.

"Monitoring a sex offender with his own private islands and the resources to fly victims in and out on private planes and helicopters presented unique challenges".

Another victim who allegedly had been forced to perform sex acts at Little St. James tried to escape the private island, but Epstein and a search party found her, returned her to his house, and suggested physical restraint or harm if she failed to cooperate, the lawsuit says.

"Epstein maintained a deliberately complex web of Virgin Islands corporations, limited liability companies, foundations, and other entities, not all of which are yet known to the Government of the Virgin Islands", the lawsuit says.

The lawsuit seeks to confiscate hundreds of millions of dollars from Epstein's estate in the Virgin Islands, including private islands Little St. James and Great St. James, which the suit values at $86 million.

He instead met them at his office on St. Thomas.

He is also accused of using fake visas to traffic women and girls, several of them aspiring models, in and out of the island territory and using a computerised database in order to track his victims' movements on his island.

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